News
No item found

GreenNet CSIR Toolkit Briefings

Nu-Skin Case

Written by for the
, 2002.

A cosmetics company called Nu-Skin threatened to sue GreenNet over a website published by a former employee that GreenNet was hosting.

The site made accusations concerning what it claimed were illegal levels of formaldehyde in some Nu-Skin products. The site was originally on VirginNet, but this ISP asked for it to be removed after legal threats from Nu-Skin. GreenNet refused to be intimidated in the same way. GreenNet offered Nu-Skin a right of reply, at the same time making clear that if we were forced to remove the site we would post a public statement on the web explaining why the material had been removed. GreenNet also drew Nu-Skin's attention to the Biwater site as an example of what might happen then. This resulted in no further threats from Nu-Skin and the threatened website remains online here.

For more information, see http://www.labournet.org/1999/July/woz.html

The GreenNet Internet Rights Project

GreenNet is the UK member of the Association for Progressive Communications (APC), and is leading the European section of the APC's Civil Society Internet Rights Project. The primary goal of this project is to provide the resources and tools necessary to defend and expand space and opportunities for social campaigning work on the Internet against the emerging threats to civil society's use of the 'Net. This involves developing ways and means of defending threatened material and campaigning, as well as lobbying to ensure a favourable legal situation for free expression on issues of public interest.

Until recently, the social norms of Internet communities, together with a very open architecture based on supporting these norms, regulated the Internet, and was responsible for its openness. The main forces of regulation now, however, are the business sector and government legislation. Corporations and governments are pressing for fundamental changes in legislation and in the architecture of the Internet. Unless challenged, these moves could radically change the nature of the 'Net, making it a place of oppressive controls instead of freedom and openness. It is in this context that APC's Internet Rights project is being developed.

This briefing is one in a series that document different aspects of work and communication across the Internet. Although written from the perspective of the UK, much of its content is applicable to other parts of Europe. There is continuing work on these issues, as part of the European project. If you wish to know more about these briefings, or the European section of the APC Civil Society Internet Rights Project, you should contact GreenNet. You should also check the APC's web site to see if there is already a national APC member in your country who may be able to provide local help, or with whom you may be able to work to develop Internet rights resources for your own country.



Free Documentation License

Copyright © 2001, 2002 GreenNet and Paul Mobbs. Further contributions and editing by Gill Roberts and Karen Banks. The project to develop this series of briefings was managed by GreenNet and funded by the Joseph Rowntree Charitable Trust.

Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.1or any later version (see for a copy of the license).

Please note that the title of the briefing and the 'free documentation license' section are protected as 'invariant sections and should not be modified.

For more information about the Civil Society Internet Rights Project, or if you have questions about the briefings, contact ir@gn.apc.org.

 

The purpose of the 'toolkit briefings' is to explore areas relating to the use of the Internet and Internet rights. The briefings cover a wide range of issues of general and specialist interest. They are available as web pages, but also in Acrobat and other file formats so that they can be printed and supplied as hard copies.

Within the briefings there are a number of conventions regarding links:
  • Links in blue are links to other web pages or web sites.

  • Link in purple are links to the footnotes that accompany the particular briefing you are looking at.

  • Links in green are links to the glossary and cross-referencing index page to the toolkit briefings - following these links will provide you with a short definition of the term being used, and also links to other parts of the whole series of toolkit briefings where the same term is discussed.


  • Events Coming Soon
    Back to events

    Nu-Skin Case
    When: 01/01/1970
    Where:
    Who:

    A cosmetics company called Nu-Skin threatened to sue GreenNet over a website published by a former employee that GreenNet was hosting.

    Contact:
    Related link:


    What's New with WSIS

    GreenNet CSIR Toolkit Briefings

    Nu-Skin Case

    Written by for the
    , 2002.

    A cosmetics company called Nu-Skin threatened to sue GreenNet over a website published by a former employee that GreenNet was hosting.

    The site made accusations concerning what it claimed were illegal levels of formaldehyde in some Nu-Skin products. The site was originally on VirginNet, but this ISP asked for it to be removed after legal threats from Nu-Skin. GreenNet refused to be intimidated in the same way. GreenNet offered Nu-Skin a right of reply, at the same time making clear that if we were forced to remove the site we would post a public statement on the web explaining why the material had been removed. GreenNet also drew Nu-Skin's attention to the Biwater site as an example of what might happen then. This resulted in no further threats from Nu-Skin and the threatened website remains online here.

    For more information, see http://www.labournet.org/1999/July/woz.html

    The GreenNet Internet Rights Project

    GreenNet is the UK member of the Association for Progressive Communications (APC), and is leading the European section of the APC's Civil Society Internet Rights Project. The primary goal of this project is to provide the resources and tools necessary to defend and expand space and opportunities for social campaigning work on the Internet against the emerging threats to civil society's use of the 'Net. This involves developing ways and means of defending threatened material and campaigning, as well as lobbying to ensure a favourable legal situation for free expression on issues of public interest.

    Until recently, the social norms of Internet communities, together with a very open architecture based on supporting these norms, regulated the Internet, and was responsible for its openness. The main forces of regulation now, however, are the business sector and government legislation. Corporations and governments are pressing for fundamental changes in legislation and in the architecture of the Internet. Unless challenged, these moves could radically change the nature of the 'Net, making it a place of oppressive controls instead of freedom and openness. It is in this context that APC's Internet Rights project is being developed.

    This briefing is one in a series that document different aspects of work and communication across the Internet. Although written from the perspective of the UK, much of its content is applicable to other parts of Europe. There is continuing work on these issues, as part of the European project. If you wish to know more about these briefings, or the European section of the APC Civil Society Internet Rights Project, you should contact GreenNet. You should also check the APC's web site to see if there is already a national APC member in your country who may be able to provide local help, or with whom you may be able to work to develop Internet rights resources for your own country.



    Free Documentation License

    Copyright © 2001, 2002 GreenNet and Paul Mobbs. Further contributions and editing by Gill Roberts and Karen Banks. The project to develop this series of briefings was managed by GreenNet and funded by the Joseph Rowntree Charitable Trust.

    Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.1or any later version (see for a copy of the license).

    Please note that the title of the briefing and the 'free documentation license' section are protected as 'invariant sections and should not be modified.

    For more information about the Civil Society Internet Rights Project, or if you have questions about the briefings, contact ir@gn.apc.org.

     

    The purpose of the 'toolkit briefings' is to explore areas relating to the use of the Internet and Internet rights. The briefings cover a wide range of issues of general and specialist interest. They are available as web pages, but also in Acrobat and other file formats so that they can be printed and supplied as hard copies.

    Within the briefings there are a number of conventions regarding links:
  • Links in blue are links to other web pages or web sites.

  • Link in purple are links to the footnotes that accompany the particular briefing you are looking at.

  • Links in green are links to the glossary and cross-referencing index page to the toolkit briefings - following these links will provide you with a short definition of the term being used, and also links to other parts of the whole series of toolkit briefings where the same term is discussed.


  • New Resources

    Nu-Skin Case
    URL:
    Area of interest/expertise: Expression and Defamation,
    Brief description: A cosmetics company called Nu-Skin threatened to sue GreenNet over a website published by a former employee that GreenNet was hosting.
    Contact email:


    A listing here is not intended as an endorsement of any of the views expressed on other organisationsí sites. Descriptions are sourced from the organisations themselves.

    For more links, see here


    No item found

    Members of